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UNIMELB



Description

Established in 1853, the University of Melbourne is committed to cross-disciplinary research, creating opportunities for the best minds to work together to tackle some of the world’s most challenging research problems and providing outstanding opportunities for training and developing a new generation of researchers. The University was recently ranked in the top 30 medical research universities in the world in the recent Times Educational survey.

The blood-brain barrier group in UNIMELB is the longest established one in the world that studies barrier mechanisms in the developing brain. Their expertise is particularly in methods they have developed for in vivo experiments in fragile embryos and neonates under normal physiological and pathological conditions. Their original discovery of a developmentally regulated protein transfer mechanism across the choroid plexus epithelial cells opens up an important avenue for research on the relation between the control of the internal environment of the brain and its development in the normal and disordered brain, as well as a novel approach for the delivery of macromolecules into both the developing and adult brain. They shall be able to contribute our in vivo expertise to experiments planned within the project.

 

Persons

Norman Saunders This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Katarzyna Dziegielewska This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

The team leaders Norman Saunders and Katarzyna Dziegielewska have extensive experience of research group management. The group is the only one in the world with continuous experience of in vivo blood-brain barrier methodology over the past 40 years. Norman Saunders pioneered the use of very immature fetal sheep in this field. Norman Saunders and Katarzyna Dziegielewska pioneered the use of neonatal marsupials. They also developed the field of CSF proteins in embryos and fetuses transfer from blood to CSF.

Mark Habgood This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Mark Habgood developed new in vivo techniques in embryonic and neonatal rodents.

Joakim Ek This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Joakim Ek was the first to develop EM techniques for ultrastructural visualisation of small non-toxic molecular probes that were validated for permeability studies.

 

Contact

UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE

PARKVILLEOFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR
Melbourne 3010
AUSTRALIA

www.unimelb.edu.au

 



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Funded by the European Commisssion under the grant agreement n° HEALTH-F2-2009-241778.